Our story

ABOUT TAPINOS

Welcome to Tapinos

Since September 2017

Recently opened in September 2017, Tapinos is a traditional spanish tapas bar bringing to South Ealing the passion for tapas and wines.
The word Tapinos means tapas and wines in Spanish.

About Tapas

Tapas is a popular way of eating that’s taken the world by storm.
Tapas has less a set of history than a collection of elaborate tales, possibly as many as the regions of Spain itself.

One of the most popular stories claim that , back in the 12th century, King Alfons X of Castille, found that, while he was recuperating from an illness, he could only eat and drink in a small amounts, resulting in one of the first forms of tapas.

His majesty thought this was stupendous and, on his recovery, decreed that all drinks should be served with small snack.Another story states that his much later 19th century namesake, Alfons XIII, once ordered wine in a tavern in Cadiz.

Since Cadiz is very windy and dusty, the bartender kindly served it with a slice of ham on top to keep the sand out.The King enjoyed his wine and ham so much, he ordered the same again and, as is often the way with kings, in doing so started a trend.

Other origin myths are more humble. According to some, tapas began at a farmer’s bar in Seville where the bartenders would serve beer or wine with a saucer on top to keep the flies out.

Then they realizedĀ  that they could use the saucer to serve a little ham, some olives or cheese. The clever move made costumers come back, thanks to the bar’s apparent generosity.

About Spanish Wines

Viticulture has been a part of Spain since the tertiary (2.6 million years ago), long before the Phoenicians founded Cadiz and stablished it as a trading post, around 1100 b.c.

The Carthaginians improved the wine making techniques of the Phoenicians when they arrived in the peninsula, but the real wine history and culture began after the Romans won the Punic wars against the Carthaginians and the Peninsula became part of the Roman empire who named it Hispania.

Viticulture has been a part of Spain since the tertiary (2.6 million years ago), long before the Phoenicians founded Cadiz and stablished it as a trading post, around 1100 b.c.

The Carthaginians improved the wine making techniques of the Phoenicians when they arrived in the peninsula, but the real wine history and culture began after the Romans won the Punic wars against the Carthaginians and the Peninsula became part of the Roman empire who named it Hispania.

The time Hispania spent under the Roman rule was a golden age for Spanish wine.The level of exportations never ceased to climb, and soon it was a product coveted by everyone.The two main production areas were Andalusia and Tarragona.

After the decline of Roman empire, the barbaric tribes from the north of Europe invaded the peninsula.

The Muslims movedĀ  in and wine culture improved in the peninsula during their stay because never prevented Christians from producing their own wines.

The discovery of the new world by Christopher Columbus open up the exportation options and the Spanish conquistadors took Spanish wines with them in order to start wine production in the new Spanish colonies.The 15th and 16th centuries saw a huge rise in the popularity of Spanish wines which were been produced in almost every area of the Iberian peninsula.

The discovery of the new world by Christopher Columbus open up the exportation options and the Spanish conquistadors took Spanish wines with them in order to start wine production in the new Spanish colonies.The 15th and 16th centuries saw a huge rise in the popularity of Spanish wines which were been produced in almost every area of the Iberian peninsula.